Wednesday, 18 April 2018

How to choose the right cat

One of the most exciting parts of getting a new cat is a visit to your local centre, where you’ll have the chance to meet many cats looking to be homed. Before you get taken in by rows of furry faces vying for your attention, it’s best to have a think about what sort of cat is the best fit for you and your lifestyle.

Are you looking for a cat who will be content to sit on your lap, or a playful cat more suited to outdoor life? How much time and energy do you have to dedicate to a feline companion? Thinking these things through will ensure you’ll achieve the right match for you and your potential pet.

Kitten or adult?


Kittens are adorable and often full of energy, making them difficult to resist! They also demand a lot of supervision and a lot of patience. Of course, you won’t know what kind of cat you’ll end up with once they outgrow their kitten personality. Adult cats are usually calmer and less inclined to cause mischief. If you’re looking for particular traits, consider cats that are at least a year old.

Personality


Cats, like people, are individuals. Some are laid-back and will tolerate handling, making them perfect for young children or older people. Other cats don’t like to be picked up or held for long, only interacting with you when food is available or when they need a bit of attention. What kind of cat will suit your family?

Family


While young children might be keen to get a kitten, it's important to remember that kittens require a lot of attention and care. Teach your child to handle them carefully and always make sure they are supervised when playing with them. It can be hard for little ones to resist giving a cat a big hug, something that might make the cat feel uncomfortable.

Medical conditions


Why not consider homing a cat with a disability? They might be older, deaf, blind or have an illness that requires regular medication but this doesn’t affect the amount of companionship they have to give. Many cats with special needs make lovely pets. They’re also more likely to be indoor cats, making them a great choice if you don’t have a garden or live in a small space.

Existing pets


If you already have pets, you’ll need to consider their needs before bringing home a new cat. Cats are a solitary species, meaning they like to be alone and don’t need ‘friends.’ Some cats are able to tolerate other cats if they’re introduced into the home carefully, while others will find it impossible. The more cats you have, the more potential issues – they may communicate their stress through behaviours such as spraying urine, fighting or hiding.
To search for your perfect cat companion, use our Find a Cat tool. By using the filters, you’re able to search for cats that can live with other cats and those who can live indoors. For more information on adopting a cat, visit www.cats.org.uk/adopting-a-cat


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